book Now

Booking is simple. Please remember to always use your child’s name.
If you feel unsure, please contact us before booking. By making a booking you agree with our Terms and Conditions of service.

Start your Booking
or You can log in if you have an account

interested in our programs?

We're looking forward to speaking with you.
Simply choose a date and time below so you can to meet with one of our wellbeing specialists. There are so many ways we can support your schools or clinics.

find out more

We're Media Friendly

We collaborate with international media outlets to
promote children's mental health and wellbeing.
If your publication has met with us before, book below.
Your first time? Contact us.

find out more
We pride ourselves on being different. We think from a child’s perspective and use the creative, award-winning tools we’ve designed to improve and optimise their mental health.

Dealing with Exam Anxiety

by

Leonardo Rocker

Exams are a time when students of all ages feel more stressed than usual. Stress can also be a positive thing as it aids motivation and concentration. However, too much stress can make a young person feel overwhelmed, confused, exhausted and edgy and consequently produce a negative impact on study results.

Exam anxiety is a natural reaction to too much pressure and can come from a number of sources including: young people themselves; comparisons with others; wanting to reach too ambitious goals; family members; peers or teachers.

Symptoms of Exam Anxiety

Signs your child may be experiencing exam anxiety include:

  • Being cranky and irritable;
  • Sleeping difficulties;
  • Complaints of chest pains and/or nausea;
  • Low self-esteem;
  • Losing touch with friends;
  • Difficulty getting motivated.

Suggestions for managing exam stress

  • Effective Study habits:Effective study and learning habits can help to reduce exam stress in students of all ages.
  • Diet: Ensure your child is eating regular healthy meals throughout the exam period, drinking lots of water, and that they are monitoring their caffeine or sugar intake.
  • Lifestyle: Encourage your child to keep up leisure activities such as seeing friends, exercising, or even watching television, as these activities give the brain a much-needed break from studying, which will allow for more effective study in the future.
  • Sleep: Encourage your child to stop studying at least one hour prior to going to bed, in order to help them unwind and have a more restful sleep.
  • Relaxation: Relaxation techniques such as breathing and muscle exercises can help your child calm down and manage their stress symptoms in a range of environments and situations.

Please contact our clinic to make an appointment if you believe your child would benefit from some assistance in dealing with exam stress.

Further Reading

Flower in a Pot

View article references

  • Information for this fact sheet was taken from Kimberley O’Brien, Child Psychologist, ReachOut .com, ParentLine and Kids Help Line

Related Products

No items found.

back to top